Clay

by Carol S. Lashof

Read an Excerpt

About the Play

Dramedy. 30-40 minutes. 2 males, 2 females. Suitable for high school and older performers, and middle school and older audiences.

Classic High School (Providence, RI; photo by Stanley Glazer), directed by Matthew Glazer.

Synopsis

Aaron blames homework for ruining his life but still he plugs away, ever hopeful that today will be the day he gets all his assignments done on time, makes his parents happy, and maybe even finds a girlfriend. Zeta cheats. A little. Loaded up with AP and Honors classes, she reasons that no sensible person would write every English paper from scratch or neglect to bring a cheat sheet to a French exam. The only class she enjoys is art—how could anyone not love the smell of clay? Will, on the other hand, could breeze through school if he chose to. And he always goes to class when there’s a good reason. But usually there’s not, so he’s flunking out. Ordinarily, these three students would never talk to each other, but when a group project for French class brings them together, they're forced to confront their stereotypes and their anxieties—and even more troubling, their wishes and dreams.

Qty Price Total
Printed Script $6.95 $0.00
Digital Perusal Script $6.95 $0.00
Performance Royalties $40.00 $0.00
Production Photocopy License $25.00 $0.00
Classroom Photocopy License $55.00 $0.00
Video License $50.00 $0.00
Subtotal:

Professional rights should be negotiated directly with YouthPLAYS at info@youthplays.com.

Synopsis

Aaron blames homework for ruining his life but still he plugs away, ever hopeful that today will be the day he gets all his assignments done on time, makes his parents happy, and maybe even finds a girlfriend. Zeta cheats. A little. Loaded up with AP and Honors classes, she reasons that no sensible person would write every English paper from scratch or neglect to bring a cheat sheet to a French exam. The only class she enjoys is art—how could anyone not love the smell of clay? Will, on the other hand, could breeze through school if he chose to. And he always goes to class when there’s a good reason. But usually there’s not, so he’s flunking out. Ordinarily, these three students would never talk to each other, but when a group project for French class brings them together, they're forced to confront their stereotypes and their anxieties—and even more troubling, their wishes and dreams.