Double Heart (The Courtship of Beatrice and Benedick)

by David Hansen

Read an Excerpt

About the Play

Romantic Comedy. 50-60 minutes. 2-3 females, 2-6 males (4-8 performers possible). Suitable for high school and older performers, and middle school and older audiences.

“Beautiful turns of language and a touch of weirdness.” —Time Out New York

"Brilliantly written in Iambic Pentameter ... It would make a great family friendly matinee for any company producing Much Ado in the evening.” —NYC Then and Now

"You don’t have to know a thing about Much Ado to get a major buzz from Double Heart ... The language is funny and at times quite elegant and wise about issues of the heart." —Rave and Pan (Cleveland, OH)

Great Lakes Theater (Cleveland, OH; photo by Robert Muller).

Synopsis

Double Heart imagines two of William Shakespeare’s most beloved characters, the quick-witted lovers Beatrice and Benedick, as they may have first met as impetuous, young teenagers. A brash young soldier (Benedick) meets a young lady with an independent streak (Beatrice), and they quickly learn to see each other as equals among fools. Their relationship deepens until world events and war intrude and hearts get broken. Written entirely in verse, this Shakespearean “prequel” features dancing and swordfighting, and walks the line between romance and comedy.

Qty Price Total
Printed Script $6.95 $0.00
Digital Perusal Script $6.95 $0.00
Performance Royalties $50.00 $0.00
Production Photocopy License $35.00 $0.00
Classroom Photocopy License $55.00 $0.00
Video License $60.00 $0.00
Subtotal:

Professional rights should be negotiated directly with YouthPLAYS at info@youthplays.com.

Synopsis

Double Heart imagines two of William Shakespeare’s most beloved characters, the quick-witted lovers Beatrice and Benedick, as they may have first met as impetuous, young teenagers. A brash young soldier (Benedick) meets a young lady with an independent streak (Beatrice), and they quickly learn to see each other as equals among fools. Their relationship deepens until world events and war intrude and hearts get broken. Written entirely in verse, this Shakespearean “prequel” features dancing and swordfighting, and walks the line between romance and comedy.